DIVERSIFYING THE DIALOGUE POST-KATRINA—RACE, PLACE, AND DISPLACEMENT IN NEW ORLEANS, U.S.A.

Authors

  • Antoinette T. Jackson


Abstract

Intensive media focus on New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the massive displacement of nearly half a million people brought national attention to large scale disparities in housing, environmental protections, access to services, education, and healthcare for a vast number of residents. These disparities, racialized and socio-economically embedded, were a reality for many long before Katrina and in places in New Orleans unfamiliar to many. For the most part however, they have remained invisible to those not directly affected. This analysis makes visible stories, critiques, and visions for the future shared primarily by African American residents and former residents of New Orleans, Louisiana. [New Orleans, disaster management, race, place, heritage]

Ancillary