Consolidation of Nanostructured β-SiC by Spark Plasma Sintering

Authors

  • Takeshi Yamamoto,

    1. Department of Materials Chemistry and the High-Tech Research Center, Ryukoku University, Seta, Otsu 520-2194, Japan
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      Member, American Ceramic Society.

  • Hidetoshi Kitaura,

    1. Department of Materials Chemistry and the High-Tech Research Center, Ryukoku University, Seta, Otsu 520-2194, Japan
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  • Yasuhiro Kodera,

    1. Department of Materials Chemistry and the High-Tech Research Center, Ryukoku University, Seta, Otsu 520-2194, Japan
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  • Takashi Ishii,

    1. Department of Materials Chemistry and the High-Tech Research Center, Ryukoku University, Seta, Otsu 520-2194, Japan
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  • Manshi Ohyanagi,

    1. Department of Materials Chemistry and the High-Tech Research Center, Ryukoku University, Seta, Otsu 520-2194, Japan
    2. Facility for Advanced Combustion Synthesis (FACS), Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616
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      Member, American Ceramic Society.

  • Zuhair A. Munir

    1. Facility for Advanced Combustion Synthesis (FACS), Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616
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      Fellow, American Ceramic Society.


  • R. Riedel—contributing editor

  • This work was supported by the 2002 research fund of Ryukoku University for the long-term researcher and was partially supported by a grant based on the High-Tech Research Center Program for Private Universities from the Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science, and Technology to M.O. and by a grant from the Army Research Office (ARO) to Z.A.M.

Abstract

Nanostructured β-SiC, with crystallite size in the range of 5–20 nm in agglomerates of 50–150 nm, was formed by reactive high-energy ball milling and consolidated to a relative density of 98% by sintering at 1700°C without the use of additives. X-ray line broadening analysis gave a crystallite size of 25 nm, while transmission electron microscopy observations showed the crystallite size to be in the range of 30–50 nm. Evidence demonstrating the role of a disorder–order transformation in the densification process is provided by changes in the diffraction peak patterns and in the integral width with temperature.

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