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Combined Jonker and Ioffe Analysis of Oxide Conductors and Semiconductors

Authors

  • Qimin Zhu,

    1. Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208
    2. Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center, Evanston, Illinois 60208
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  • E. Mitchell Hopper,

    1. Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208
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    • *Member, The American Ceramic Society.

  • Brian J. Ingram,

    1. Argonne National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne, Illinois 60643
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    • *Member, The American Ceramic Society.

  • Thomas O. Mason

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208
    2. Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center, Evanston, Illinois 60208
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    • **Fellow, The American Ceramic Society.


  • W.-Y. Ching—contributing editor

  • This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as part of an Energy Frontier Research Center under grant no. DE-SC0001059. EMH and TOM acknowledge the support of the MRSEC program of the National Science Foundation (DMR-0502513) at the Materials Research Center of Northwestern University. This work made use of central facilities of the Northwestern University Materials Research Center.

†Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: t-mason@northwestern.edu

Abstract

Jonker plots (Seebeck coefficient versus logarithm of conductivity) have been utilized to obtain the product of the density of states (DOS) and mobility (μ) in oxide semiconductors, from which the maximum electrical conductivity can be estimated for degenerate transparent conducting oxide (TCO) applications. In addition, the DOS–μ product can be utilized to predict the maximum achievable “power factor” (PF, Seebeck coefficient squared times conductivity) for oxide semiconductors. The PF is an important parameter governing the figure of merit for thermoelectric oxide (TEO) applications. The procedure employs an analysis developed by Ioffe, and provides an important screening tool for oxide (and other) thermoelectric materials, based upon data from polycrystalline ceramic specimens. Several oxides, including known transparent conductors, are considered as TCO and TEO case studies in the present work.

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