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Temperature Dependence of Effective Grain Core/Single Crystal Dielectric Constants for Acceptor-Doped Oxygen Ion Conductors

Authors

  • Nicola H. Perry,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208
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    • *Member, The American Ceramic Society.

  • Ted C. Yeh,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208
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    • *Member, The American Ceramic Society.

  • Thomas O. Mason

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208
      †Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: t-mason@northwestern.edu
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    • **Fellow, The American Ceramic Society.


  • J. Nino—contributing editor

  • Based in part on the thesis submitted by N. H. Perry for the Ph.D. degree in Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, IL, 2009.

  • This work was financially supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under contract no. DE-FG02-05ER-46255 (NHP, TCY, TOM) and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (NHP).

†Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: t-mason@northwestern.edu

Abstract

Effective grain core or single crystal dielectric constants of four solid oxide electrolytes—yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ with 8 and 7 mol% yttria), tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (TZP with 3 mol% yttria), strontium- and magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC, with 20 mol% gadolinia)—were studied as a function of temperature by AC-impedance spectroscopy and equivalent circuit fitting. Unlike their undoped counterparts, the acceptor-doped oxides consistently exhibited an upturn in effective grain core/single crystal dielectric constant in the vicinity of 350–500 K. This temperature-dependent behavior was attributed to the onset of thermally activated dipolar relaxation—an explanation supported by the appearance of loss tangent peaks at higher temperatures. Differences between “effective” dielectric constants and frequency-dependent complex dielectric constants for the grain core/single crystal frequency range, and applications of the effective dielectric constant data are discussed.

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