Intragranular Tungsten/Zirconium Carbide Nanocomposites via a Selective Liquid/Solid Displacement Reaction

Authors

  • David W. Lipke,

    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
    Current affiliation:
    1. Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards AFB, California
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    • Member, The American Ceramic Society.
  • Yunshu Zhang,

    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Ye Cai,

    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Kenneth H. Sandhage

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
    • School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
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    • Fellow, The American Ceramic Society.

  • Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, via Awards No. FA9550-07-1-0115 and FA9550-09-1-0162, and by the U.S. Department of Energy via Award No. DE-SC0002245.
  • Based in part on the thesis submitted by D.W. Lipke in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 2011.

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: ken.sandhage@mse.gatech.edu

Abstract

A selective liquid/solid displacement reaction has been used, for the first time, to convert non-oxide ceramic solid solutions into composites comprised of intragranular metal nanoparticles embedded within non-oxide ceramic microcrystals. The reaction of (ZrxW1−x)C microparticles with a ZrCu liquid at 1300°C resulted in the formation of W/ZrC microparticles with a core-shell morphology. The internal microparticle core was comprised of W nanoparticles embedded within a single crystal ZrC matrix, whereas the W-free shell was comprised of an epitaxial layer of ZrC. Such a selective liquid/solid reaction process may be used to generate a variety of intragranular metal/ceramic-matrix composites.

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