SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Andruski, J. (2006). Tone clarity in mixed pitch/phonation-type tones. Journal of Phonetics, 34(3), 388404.
  • Aslin, R. N., Werker, J. F., & Morgan, J. L. (2002). Innate phonetic boundaries revisited (L). The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 112(4), 12571260.
  • Atkins, J. E., Fiser, J., & Jacobs, R. A. (2001). Experience-dependent visual cue integration based on consistencies between visual and haptic percepts. Vision Research, 41(4), 449461.
  • Ballem, K. D., & Plunkett, K. (2005). Phonological specificity in children at 1;2. Journal of Child Language, 32(1), 159173.
  • Bortfeld, H., & Morgan, J. L. (2010). Is early word-form processing stress-full? How natural variability supports recognition. Cognitive Psychology, 60(4), 241266.
  • Bourne, L. E., & Restle, F. (1959). Mathematical theory of concept identification. Psychological Review, 66, 278296.
  • Bradlow, A. R., Nygaard, L. C., & Pisoni, D. B. (1999). Effects of talker, rate, and amplitude variation on recognition memory for spoken words. Perception & Psychophysics, 61(2), 206219.
  • Bush, R. R., & Mosteller, F. (1951). A model for stimulus generalization and discrimination. Psychological Review, 58(6), 413423.
  • Charles-Luce, J., & Luce, P. A. (1990). Similarity neighbourhoods of words in young children’s lexicons. Journal of Child Language, 17(1), 205215.
  • Charles-Luce, J., & Luce, P. A. (1995). An examination of similarity neighbourhoods in young children’s receptive vocabularies. Journal of Child Language, 22(3), 727735.
  • Coady, J. A., & Aslin, R. N. (2003). Phonological neighbourhoods in the developing lexicon. Journal of Child Language, 30(2), 441469.
  • Creel, S. C., Aslin, R. N., & Tanenhaus, M. K. (2008). Heeding the voice of experience: The role of talker variation in lexical access. Cognition, 106(2), 633664.
  • Dietrich, C., Swingley, D., & Werker, J. F. (2007). Native language governs interpretation of salient speech sound differences at 18 months. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104(41), 1602716031.
  • Eimas, P. D., Siqueland, E. R., Jusczyk, P., & Vigorito, J. (1971). Speech perception in infants. Science, 171(3968), 303306.
  • Ernst, M. O., & Banks, M. S. (2002). Humans integrate visual and haptic information in a statistically optimal fashion. Nature, 415(6870), 429433.
  • Fennell, C. T., & Waxman, S. R. (2010). What paradox? Referential cues allow for infant use of phonetic detail in word learning. Child Development, 81(5), 13761383.
  • Fennell, C. T., & Werker, J. F. (2003). Early word learners’ ability to access phonetic detail in well-known words. Language and Speech, 46(2–3), 245264.
  • Gliozzi, V., Mayor, J., Hu, J.-F., & Plunkett, K. (2009). Labels as features (not names) for infant categorization: A neurocomputational approach. Cognitive Science, 33(4), 709738.
  • Goldinger, S. D. (1998). Echoes of echoes? An episodic theory of lexical access. Psychological Review, 105(2), 251279.
  • Gómez, R. L. (2002). Variability and detection of invariant structure. Psychological Science, 13(5), 431436.
    Direct Link:
  • Gooden, D. R., & Baddeley, A. D. (1975). Context-dependent memory in two natural environments: On land and underwater. British Journal of Psychology, 6(3), 325331.
    Direct Link:
  • Hawkins, S. (2003). Roles and representations of systematic fine phonetic detail in speech understanding. Journal of Phonetics, 31(3–4), 373405.
  • Hirsh-Pasek, K., Golinkoff, R. M., & Hollich, G. (2000). An emergentist coalition model for word learning: Mapping words to objects is a property of the interaction of multiple cues. In R. M.Golinkoff, K.Hirsh-Pasek, L.Bloom, L. B.Smith, A. L.Woodward, N.Akhtar, M.Tomasello, and G.Hollich (Eds.), On becoming a word learner: A debate on lexical acquisition (pp. 136164). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
  • Kruschke, J. K. (1992). Alcove: An exemplar-based connectionist model of category learning. Psychological Review, 99(1), 2244.
  • Kruschke, J. K. (2001). Toward a unified model of attention in associative learning. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 45, 812863.
  • Kuhl, P. K., Williams, K. A., Lacerda, F., Stevens, K. N., & Lindblom, B. (1992). Linguistic experience alters phonetic perception in infants by 6 months of age. Science, 255(5044), 606608.
  • Lively, S. E., Logan, J. S., & Pisoni, D. B. (1993). Training Japanese listeners to identify English /r/ and /l/ II: The role of phonetic environment and talker variability in learning new perceptual categories. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 94(3), 12421255.
  • MacWhinney, B. (1989). Competition and lexical categorization. In R.Corrigan, F.Eckman, & M.Noonan (Eds.), Linguistic categorization (pp. 195242). Current Issues in Linguistic Theory 61. New York: Benjamins.
  • Maye, J., Werker, J. F., & Gerken, L. (2002). Infant sensitivity to distributional information can affect phonetic discrimination. Cognition, 82(3), B101B111.
  • McMurray, B., Aslin, R. N., & Toscano, J. C. (2009). Statistical learning of phonetic categories: Insights from a computational approach. Developmental Science, 12(3), 369378.
  • McMurray, B., Horst, J., Toscano, J., & Samuelson, L. (2009) Connectionist learning and dynamic processing: Symbiotic developmental mechanisms. In J. P.Spencer, M.Thomas, & J.McClelland (Eds.), Towards a new grand theory of development? Connectionism and dynamic systems theory reconsidered (pp. 218249). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Metsala, J. L., & Walley, A. C. (1998). Spoken vocabulary growth and the segmental restructuring of lexical representations: Precursors to phonemic awareness and early reading ability. In J. L.Metsala & L. C.Ehri (Eds.), Word recognition in beginning literacy (pp. 89120). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Nosofsky, R. M. (1986). Attention, similarity, and the identification-categorization relationship. Journal of Experimental Psychology. General, 115(1), 3961.
  • Oakes, L. M., Coppage, D. J., & Dingel, A. (1997). By land or by sea: The role of perceptual similarity in infants’ categorization of animals. Developmental Psychology, 33(3), 396407.
  • Pater, J., Stager, C. L., & Werker, J. F. (2004). The lexical acquisition of phonological contrasts. Language, 80, 361379.
  • Peterson, G. E., & Barney, H. L. (1952). Control methods used in a study of the vowels. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 24, 175184.
  • Pierrehumbert, J. B. (2001). Exemplar dynamics: Word frequency, lenition and contrast. In J.Bybee & P.Hopper (Eds.), Frequency and the emergence of linguistic structure (pp. 137157). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Pitt, M. A., Kim, W., Navarro, D. J., & Myung, J. I. (2006). Global model analysis by parameter space partitioning. Psychological Review, 113(1), 5783.
  • Quinn, P. C., Eimas, P. D., & Rosenkrantz, S. L. (1993). Evidence for representations of perceptually similar natural categories by 3-month-old and 4-month-old infants. Perception, 22(4), 463475.
  • Ranbom, L., & Connine, C. M. (2007). Lexical representation of phonological variation. Journal of Memory and Language, 57, 273298.
  • Regier, T. (2005). The emergence of words: Attentional learning in form and meaning. Cognitive Science, 29, 819865.
  • Restle, F. (1955). A theory of discrimination learning. Psychological Review, 62(1), 1119.
  • Rost, G. C., & McMurray, B. (2009). Speaker variability augments phonological processing in early word learning. Developmental Science, 12(2), 339349.
  • Rost, G. C., & McMurray, B. (2010). Finding the signal by adding noise: The role of non-contrastive phonetic variability in early word learning. Infancy, 15(6), 608635.
  • Rumelhart, D. E., & Zipser, D. (1985). Feature discovery by competitive learning. Cognitive Science, 9(1), 75112.
  • Samuelson, L. K., Schutte, A. R., & Horst, J. S. (2009). The dynamic nature of knowledge: Insights from a dynamic field model of children’s novel noun generalization. Cognition, 110(3), 322345.
  • Schafer, G., & Mareschal, D. (2001). Modeling infant speech sound discrimination using simple associative networks. Infancy, 2(1), 728.
  • Singh, L., Morgan, J. L., & White, K. S. (2004). Preference and processing: The role of speech affect in early spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 51(2), 173189.
  • Singh, L., White, K. S., & Morgan, J. L. (2008). Building a word-form lexicon in the face of variable input: Influences of pitch and amplitude on early spoken word recognition. Language Learning and Development, 4(2), 157178.
  • Sirois, S., & Mareschal, D. (2004). An interacting systems model of infant habituation. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 16(8), 13521362.
  • Stager, C. L., & Werker, J. F. (1997). Infants listen for more phonetic detail in speech perception than in word-learning tasks. Nature, 388(6640), 381382.
  • Summerfield, Q., & Haggard, M. (1977). On the dissociation of spectral and temporal cues to the voicing distinction in initial stop consonants. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 62(2), 435448.
  • Swingley, D., & Aslin, R. N. (2002). Lexical neighborhoods and the word-form representations of 14-month-olds. Psychological Science, 13(5), 480484.
    Direct Link:
  • Swingley, D., & Aslin, R. N. (2007). Lexical competition in young children’s word learning. Cognitive Psychology, 54(2), 99132.
  • Thiessen, E. D. (2007). The effect of distributional information on children’s use of phonemic contrasts. Journal of Memory and Language, 56(1), 1634.
  • Thiessen, E. D. (2010). Variability in lexical form facilitates children’s generalization of phonemic contrasts. Paper presented at the 17th Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, Baltimore, MD.
  • Toscano, J. C., & McMurray, B. (2010). Cue integration with categories: Weighting acoustic cues in speech using unsupervised learning and distributional statistics. Cognitive Science, 34, 434464.
  • Walley, A. C., Metsala, J. L., & Garlock, V. M. (2003). Spoken vocabulary growth: Its role in the development of phoneme awareness and early reading ability. Reading and Writing, 16(1), 520.
  • Wasserman, E. A., & Miller, R. R. (1997). What’s elementary about associative learning? Annual Review of Psychology, 48, 573607.
  • Werker, J. F., Cohen, L. B., Lloyd, V. L., Casasola, M., & Stager, C. L. (1998). Acquisition of word-object associations by 14-month-old infants. Developmental Psychology, 34(6), 12891309.
  • Werker, J. F., & Curtin, S. (2005). PRIMIR: A developmental framework of infant speech processing. Language Learning and Development, 1(2), 197234.
  • Werker, J. F., Fennell, C. T., Corcoran, K. M., & Stager, C. L. (2002). Infants’ ability to learn phonetically similar words: Effects of age and vocabulary size. Infancy, 3(1), 130.
  • Werker, J. F., & Tees, R. C. (1984). Cross-language speech perception: Evidence for perceptual reorganization during the first year of life. Infant Behavior and Development, 7, 4963.
  • Woodward, A. L., & Hoyne, K. L. (1999). Infants’ learning about words and sounds in relation to objects. Child Development, 70(1), 6577.
  • Yeung, H. H., & Werker, J. F. (2009). Learning words’ sounds before learning how words sound: 9-month olds use distinct objects as cues to categorize speech information. Cognition, 113(2), 234243.
  • Yoshida, K. A., Fennell, C. T., Swingley, D., & Werker, J. F. (2009). Fourteen-month-old infants learn similar-sounding words. Developmental Science, 12(3), 412418.