SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Anderson, J. R. (1982). Acquisition of cognitive skill. Psychological Review, 89, 396406.
  • Barner, D., Wood, J., Hauser, M., & Carey, S. (2008). Evidence for a non-linguistic distinction between singular and plural sets in rhesus monkeys. Cognition, 107, 603622.
  • Birnbaum, D., Deeb, I., Segal, G., Ben-Eliyahu, A., & Diesendruck, G. (2010). The development of social essentialism: The case of Israeli children’s inferences about Jews and Arabs. Child Development, 81, 757777.
  • Callanan, M. A. (1989). Development of object categories and inclusion relations: Preschoolers’ hypotheses about word meanings. Developmental Psychology, 25, 207216.
  • Carey, S. (2009). The Origin of Concepts. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Chaffin, R., & Herrmann, D.J. (1988). The nature of semantic relations: A comparison of two approaches. In M.E. Evens (Ed.), Relational models of the lexicon (pp. 289334). New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Cimpian, A., & Markman, E. M. (2011). The generic/non-generic distinction influences how children interpret new information about social others. Child Development, 82, 471492.
  • Collins, A. M., & Quillian, M. R. (1969). Retrieval time from semantic memory. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 8, 240247.
  • Connolly, A. C., Fodor, J. A., Gleitman, L. R., & Gleitman, H. (2007). Why stereotypes don’t even make good defaults. Cognition, 103, 122.
  • Diesendruck, G., & Shatz, M. (2001). Two-year-olds’ recognition of hierarchies: Evidence from their interpretation of the semantic relation between object labels. Cognitive Development, 16, 577594.
  • Dove, G. (2009). Beyond perceptual symbols: A call for representational pluralism. Cognition, 110, 412431.
  • Estes, Z., & Glucksberg, S. (2000). Interactive property attribution in concept combination. Memory & Cognition, 28, 2834.
  • Feigenson, L., & Halberda, J. (2004). Infants chunk object arrays into sets of individuals. Cognition, 91, 173190.
  • Gagne, C. L., & Shoben, E. J. (1997). Influence of thematic relations on the comprehension of modifier-noun combinations. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 23, 7187.
  • Gelman, S. A. (2003). The essential child: Origins of essentialism in everyday thought. London: Oxford University Press.
  • Gelman, S. A., & Heyman, G. D. (1999). Carrot-eaters and creature-believers: The effects of lexicalization on children’s inferences about social categories. Psychological Science, 10, 489493.
    Direct Link:
  • Gleitman, L. R., & Gleitman, H. (1970). Phrase and paraphrase: Some innovative uses of language. New York: W. W. Norton & Co.
  • Hall, D. G., & Moore, C. E. (1997). Red bluebirds and black greenflies: Children’s understanding of the semantics of adjectives and count nouns. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 67, 236267.
  • Hampton, J. A. (1982). A demonstration of intransitivity in natural categories. Cognition, 12, 151164.
  • Hampton, J. A. (1987). Inheritance of attributes in natural concept conjunctions. Memory & Cognition, 15, 5571.
  • Hampton, J. A. (1997). Conceptual combination. In K. Lamberts & D. R. Shanks (Eds.), Knowledge, concepts and categories (pp. 135162). Hove, UK: Psychology Press.
  • Hoffman, A. B., Harris, H. D., & Murphy, G. L. (2008). Prior knowledge enhances the category dimensionality effect. Memory & Cognition, 36, 256270.
  • Johnson, C., & Keil, F. C. (2000). Explanatory knowledge and conceptual combination. In F.C. Keil & R.A. Wilson (Eds.), Explanation and cognition (pp. 327359). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Jonsson, M. L, & Hampton, J. A. (2007). On prototypes as defaults. Cognition, 106, 913923.
  • Keil, F.C. (1989). Concepts, kinds, and conceptual development. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Levi, J. (1978). The syntax and semantics of complex nominals. New York: Academic Press.
  • Machery, E. (2009). Doing without concepts. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Machery, E., & Lederer, L. G. (2012). Simple heuristics for concept composition. In M Werning, W. Hinzen, & E. Machery (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of compositionality (pp. 454472). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Macnamara, J. (1982). Names for things: A study of human learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Macnamara, J. (1999). Through the rearview mirror: Historical reflections on psychology. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.
  • Markman, E. M. (1989). Categorization and naming in children. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Markman, E. M., Horton, M. S., & McLanahan, A. G. (1980). Classes and collections: Principles of organization in the learning of hierarchical relations. Cognition, 8, 227241.
  • McCloskey, M. E., & Glucksberg, S. (1979). Natural categories: Well defined or fuzzy sets? Memory & Cognition, 6, 462472.
  • Medin, D., & Ortony, A. (1989). Psychological essentialism. in S. Vosniadou & A. Ortony (Eds.), Similarity and analogical reasoning. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Medin, D. L., & Shoben, E. J. (1988). Context and structure in conceptual combination. Cognitive Psychology, 20, 158190.
  • Murphy, G. L. (1988). Comprehending complex concepts. Cognitive Science, 12, 529562.
  • Murphy, G. L. (1990). Noun phrase interpretation and conceptual combination. Journal of Memory and Language, 29, 259288.
  • Murphy, G. L., & Allopena, P. D. (1994). The locus of knowledge effects in concept learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 20, 904919.
  • Murphy, G. L., & Medin, D. L. (1985). The role of theories in conceptual coherence. Psychological Review, 92, 289316.
  • O’Connor, C. M., Cree, G. S., & McRae, K. (2009). Conceptual hierarchies in a flat attractor network: Dynamics of learning and computations. Cognitive Science, 33, 665708.
  • Osherson, D. N., & Smith, E. E. (1981). On the adequacy of prototype theory as a theory of concepts. Cognition, 11, 3558.
  • Prasada, S. (1992). Acquisition of adjective meanings: A lexical semantic approach. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
  • Prasada, S. (1999). Names for things and stuff: An Aristotelian perspective. In R. Jackendoff, K. Wynn, & P. Bloom (Eds.), Language, logic, and conceptual representation: Essays in honor of John Macnamara (pp. 119146). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Prasada, S. (2010). Conceptual representations and some forms of genericity. In F. J. Pelletier (Ed.), Kinds, things and stuff (pp. 3659). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Prasada, S., & Dillingham, E. M. (2006). Principled and statistical connections in common sense conception. Cognition, 99, 73112.
  • Prasada, S., & Dillingham, E. M. (2009). Representation of principled connections: A window onto the formal aspect of common sense conception. Cognitive Science, 33, 401448.
  • Rips, L. J., Shoben, E. J., & Smith, E. E. (1973). Semantic distance and the verification of semantic relations. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 12, 120.
  • Shipley, E. F. (1989). Two kinds of hierarchies: Class inclusion hierarchies and kind hierarchies. The Genetic Epistemologist, 17, 3139.
  • Shipley, E. F. (1993). Categories, hierarchies, and induction. Psychology of Learning and Motivation, 30, 265301.
  • Sloman, S. A. (1998). Categorical inference is not a tree: The myth of inheritance hierarchies. Cognitive Psychology, 35, 133.
  • Smith, E. E., Osherson, D. N., Rips, L.J., & Keane, M. (1988). Combining concepts: A selective modification model. Cognitive Science, 12, 485527.
  • Waxman, S. R., Lynch, E. B., Casey, K. L., & Baer, L. (1997). Setters and samoyeds: The emergence of subordinate level categories as a basis for inductive inference. Developmental Psychology, 33, 10741090.
  • Waxman, S. R., Shipley, S., & Shepperson, B. (1991). Establishing new subcategories: The role of category labels and existing knowledge. Child Development, 62, 127138.
  • Weiskopf, D. A. (2009). The plurality of concepts. Synthese, 169, 145173.
  • Wierzbicka, A. (1984). Apples are not a “kind of fruit”: The semantics of human categorization. American Ethnologist, 11, 313328.
  • Wierzbicka, A. (1986). What’s in a noun? (Or: How do nouns differ in meaning from adjectives?). Studies in Language, 10, 353389.
  • Winston, M.E., Chaffin, R, & Herrmann, D. (1987). A taxonomy of part-whole relations. Cognitive Science, 11, 417444.
  • Wisniewski, E. J. (1997). When concepts combine. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 4, 167183.
  • Wisniewski, E. J., & Love, B. C. (1998). Relations versus properties in conceptual combination. Journal of Memory and Language, 38, 177202.