Soy Milks as a Dairy Milk Substitute in Prepared Food Products: Effects on Quality and Acceptability

Authors


  • Authors’ Note: Ruthann B. Swanson, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Foods and Nutrition at University of Georgia. At the time of this study, Rebecca J. McKemie, MS RD, was a graduate student in the Department of Foods and Nutrition at University of Georgia. Michael D. Sabrin, MS, was a graduate student in the Department of Foods and Nutrition at University of Georgia. Paul J Milly, PhD was a graduate student in the Department of Food Science and Technology at University of Georgia. Please address correspondence to Ruthann B. Swanson, Department of Foods and Nutrition, 180 Dawson Hall, University of Georgia, GA 30602, Athens; e-mail: rswanson@uga.edu.

Abstract

Two plain soy milks (full-fat and light) replaced 100% of the whole dairy (cow) milk in control formulas for muffins, popovers, and frozen custard-based ice milk dessert. Milks incorporated differed in total solids, pH, viscosity, particle size distribution, and color when assessed instrumentally. Quality of the prepared food products was evaluated with objective techniques, and consumer sensory panelists assessed appearance, flavor, texture, and overall acceptability. No effect of soy milk fat content on product quality or acceptability was found. Soy milk substitution impacted food product color (L*, a*, or b*). In custard-based ice milk dessert, overrun % did not differ with milk source; however, sensory results revealed both soy milks were unacceptable substitutes. In popovers, neither volume nor acceptability differed with soy milk substitution. For muffins, flavor, texture, and overall acceptability did not differ, and appearance of the soy milk products was preferred; instrumental textural differences were not found. Either soy milk can successfully be substituted for dairy milk in muffins and popovers; nutritionally, use of light soy milk is recommended.

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