The Effect of Early Parent-Infant Contact on Newborn Body Temperature

Authors

  • SUSAN T. HILL RN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Susan Hill is a perinatal testing nurse and coordinator of the Program for Childbirth Education at the Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. She has worked as a staff nurse in labor and delivery and in the intensive care nursery. Ms. Hill received her diploma from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, and is working toward her BSN from Gwynedd-Mercy College, Gwynedd Valley, Pennsylvania. She is a member of NAACOG, ICEA, and CCES.
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  • LUCILLE K. SHRONK RN, BSN

    1. Lucille Shronk recieved her BSN from Thomas Jefferson University College of Allied Health Sciences, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is a staff nurse in labor and delivery at Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, and is a member of NAACOG.
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Address for correspondence: Susan Hill, RN, Perinatal Testing Nurse, Pennsylvania Hospital, Eighth and Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107.

Abstract

To determine whether infants who are properly dried and wrapped can be held and warned by parents in the delivery room without suffering a significant heat loss, temperatures of 100 infants were monitored with electronic thermometers after delivery; 50 were held by one or both parents and 50 were not held but immediately placed in a heated transporter. A two-tailed t test showed no significant difference between temperatures of the two groups.

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