Adjustment to a Newborn

Sibling Preparation Makes a Difference

Authors

  • JULIE C. FORTIER RN, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Julie C. Fortier is an assistant professor at the University of Maryland, School of Nursing, in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Fortier is a member of NAACOG, the American Nurses' Association, and Sigma Theta Tau.
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  • VERNA BENNER CARSON RN, MS,

    1. Verna Benner Carson is an assistant professor at the University of Maryland, School of Nursing, in Baltimore, Maryland. Ms. Carson is a member of the American Nurses' Association, Phi Kappa Phi, and Sigma Theta Tau.
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  • SUSAN WILL RN, MS,

    1. Susan WIN Is a clinical nurse specialist in the Department of Women% Services– Pediatrics at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. Ms. Will is a member of NAACOG.
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  • BETTY L. SHUBKAGEL RN, PhD

    1. Betty L. Sbubkagel Is a retired professor of nursing from the University of Maryland, School of Nursing, in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Shubkagel Is a member of the American Nurses' Association, Phi Kappa Phi, and Sigma Theta Tau.
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Address for correspondence: Julie C. Fortier, RN, PhD, The University of Maryland, Baltimore County Campus, School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD 21228.

Abstract

Two groups of 20 mothers and their firstborn children (matched for age and sex) were investigated to determine whether sibling preparation for the birth of a newborn made a difference In the behavior of the children and in the mothers' perceptions of their own ability to cope with the children. One group of mothers and their children attended a sibling preparation class; the other group did not. Each group was pretested and posttested with the Parent-Child Assessment Tool. A significant difference was found between the two groups.

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