Clinical Approaches in the Assessment of Childbearing Fatigue

Authors

  • Linda C. Pugh RNC, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Linda C. Pugh is an Associate Professor and the Director of Professional Education Programs at the The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in Baltimore, MD.
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  • Renee Milligan RNC, PhD,

    1. Renee Milligan is an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.
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  • Peggy L. Parks PhD,

    1. Peggy L. Parks is a Developmental Psychologist in Baltimore, MD.
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  • Elizabeth R. Lenz RN, PhD, FAAN,

    1. Elizabeth R. Lenz is an Associate Dean for Nursing Research and Director of the Doctoral Program at Columbia University in New York, NY.
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  • Harriet Kitzman RN, PhD

    1. Harriet Kitzman is an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY.
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Address for correspondence: Linda C. Pugh, RNC, PhD, 525 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205.

Abstract

Modifications of the Fatigue Symptoms Checklist can be used clinically to assess fatigue during the childbearing year. Data from a series of studies provide beginning norms that can be used to interpret clinical scores and point to the potential importance of assessments to pregnancy complications and maternal performance. Consistent with North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) definition of fatigue and the theory of unpleasant symptoms, fatigue and performance are important phenomena critical to the experience of pregnancy and assumption of the maternal role.

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