Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding

Authors

  • Susan L. Wilhelm,

    Corresponding author
    1. Susan L. Wilhelm, PhD, RNC, is an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at University of Nebraska Medical Center, Scottsbluff, NE.
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  • Mary Beth Flanders Stepans,

    1. Mary Beth Flanders Stepans, PhD, RN, is an associate professor in the Fay Whitney School of Nursing at University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY.
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  • Melody Hertzog,

    1. Melody Hertzog, PhD, is an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE.
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  • T. Kim Callahan Rodehorst,

    1. T. Kim Callahan Rodehorst, PhD, RNC is an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Scottsbluff, NE.
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  • Patti Gardner

    1. Patti Gardner, CNM, MSN, IBCLC is a clinical nurse specialist/lactation consultant at United Medical Center, Cheyenne, WY.
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Address for correspondence: Susan L. Wilhelm, PhD, RNC, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 4502 Avenue I, Scottsbluff, NE 69361. E-mail: slwilhel@unmc.edu.

Abstract

Objective:  To explore the feasibility of using motivational interviewing to promote sustained breastfeeding by increasing a mother’s intent to breastfeed for 6 months and increasing her breastfeeding self-efficacy.

Design:  A longitudinal experimental two-group design with repeated measures was selected to explore the feasibility of using motivational interviewing to promote sustained breastfeeding in primiparous mothers.

Setting:  Three Western rural community hospital sites.

Participants:  Convenience sample of 73 primiparous breastfeeding mothers ranging between the ages of 19 and 38, M= 25 (SD= 4.5).

Main outcome measure:  Mothers reported the date of their last day of breastfeeding, defined as any breastfeeding during the previous 24-hour period. Breastfeeding behavior was confirmed at each visit by infant test weights.

Results:  The motivational interviewing group (M= 98.1 days, SD= 75.2) breastfed longer than the comparison group (M= 80.7 days, SD= 71.9); however, this difference was not significant, t(69) = 0.991, p= .325, Cohen’s d= 0.24, related to the variability in the sample.

Conclusions:  Although not a statistically significant difference, the mean number of days that mothers in the intervention group breastfed was 98 days compared to the mean of 81 days by the comparison group; therefore, motivational interviewing may be useful as a strategy to test in a comprehensive intervention plan. JOGNN, 35, 340-348; 2006. DOI: 10.1111/J.1552-6909.2006.00046.x

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