The Impact of Postpartum Depression on Mothering

Authors

  • M. Cynthia Logsdon,

    Corresponding author
    1. M. Cynthia Logsdon, DNS, ARNP, is a professor in the School of Nursing at University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.
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  • Katherine L. Wisner,

    1. Katherine L. Wisner, MD, MS, is a Professor of Psychiatry in OB/GYN at Epidemiology and Women’s Studies and director of Women’s HealthCARE at University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
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  • Melissa D. Pinto-Foltz

    1. Melissa D. Pinto-Foltz, RN, BSN, is a doctoral student in the School of Nursing at University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.
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Address for correspondence: M. Cynthia Logsdon, DNS, ARNP, School of Nursing, University of Louisville, 555 South Floyd Street, K Bldg. HSC, Louisville, KY 40202. E-mail: mclogs01@gwise.louisville.edu.

Abstract

As a rule, mothers are the primary caregivers of infants regardless of employment or marital status. Thus, any factors that impact mothering affect the infant and have public health significance. National attention is now focused on postpartum depression, a major variable affecting mothering. The impact of postpartum depression on the various components of the maternal role is described. Recommendations for health care practice include screening for depression across the first postpartum year and developing a strong network for mental health referrals. JOGNN, 35, 652-658; 2006. DOI: 10.1111/J.1552-6909.2006.00087.x

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