Understanding the Impact of Health Literacy on Women's Health

Authors

  • Carol Shieh,

    1. DNSc, RNC-OB, is an assistant professor in the Indiana University School of Nursing, Department of Environments for Health, Indianapolis, IN.
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  • Judith A. Halstead

    1. DNS, RN, ANEF, is a professor and executive associate dean for academic affairs in the Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN.
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Correspondence
Carol Shieh, DNSc, RNC-OB, Indiana University School of Nursing, Department of Environments for Health, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5107.
wshieh@iupui.edu The authors and planners for this activity report no conflict of interest or relevant financial relationships. The article includes no discussion of off-label drug or devise use.

ABSTRACT

Low health literacy negatively affects a woman's health knowledge, preventive behavior, ability to navigate the health care system, and ability to care for her children. Interventions to increase a woman's heath literacy include written education materials with proper reading level and design, clear communication, and education to increase health knowledge, self-efficacy, and self-advocacy skills. Health literacy should also be incorporated in nursing education programs.

Ancillary