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End-of-Life Care and Barriers for Female Inmates

Authors

  • Susan J. Loeb,

    1. PhD, RN, is an associate professor in the School of Nursing and the Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
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  • Janice Penrod,

    1. PhD, RN, is the director of the Center for Nursing Research and an associate professor in the School of Nursing and Department of Humanities, Penn State College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
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  • Christopher S. Hollenbeak,

    1. PhD, is an associate professor in the Departments of Surgery and Public Health Science, Penn State College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA
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  • Carol A. Smith

    1. DSN, CRNP, FNAP, is an associate professor in the School of Nursing, Penn State College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
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  • The authors report no conflict of interest or relevant financial relationships.

Correspondence
Susan J. Loeb, PhD, RN, School of Nursing, 129 D Health & Human Development East, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.
SVL100@PSU.EDU

ABSTRACT

The number of female inmates is growing, and their average age is increasing. As a result, end-of-life care is situated in a highly restrictive environment with a focus on security rather than comfort. We describe the need for and potential barriers to humane care and provide care strategies that can be useful in a complex organizational system. Frontline workers such as nurses who understand the balance between care and control must promote change in the women's prison system.

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