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Keywords:

  • newborn bath delay;
  • skin-to-skin;
  • transition

Poster Presentation

  1. Top of page
  2. Poster Presentation

Purpose for the Program

To improve newborn outcomes by implementing the evidence-based research to delay bathing the newborn.

Proposed Change

To improve newborn outcomes, implementation of evidence-based research was initiated. Implementation of bath delay showed that regardless of gestational age, the incidence of newborns experiencing hypothermia and hypoglycemia during the transitional period was reduced by changing the focus of unnecessary interventions.

Implementation, Outcomes, and Evaluation

To review the current practice and identify the prioritization of the nursing task over the outcomes of bathing, the newborn, newborn care guidelines including revision of newborn order sets were established. Reference to evidence-based research and data collection post-implementation of guidelines were utilized. Multidisciplinary team actions involved evidence-based practice data regarding the effectiveness of newborn bath delay. Scripting to parents and families were created, which included the development of crib cards in order for clinical staff to facilitate the process change by direct hands-on education.

The description of the process from admission to discharge identified the value in bath delay related to skin-to-skin research. Global hospital staff education was initiated and staff were presented with advice to give to parents and families during newborn care education. The value of skin-to-skin care with transition, bonding, and breastfeeding was emphasized. Our efforts were validated by the improved outcomes of practice change of newborn bath delay, which resulted in increased patient satisfaction.

Implications for Nursing Practice

Historical review of newborn care delivery demonstrated that nursing has shown to place priority on the completion of nursing tasks over the outcomes related to the newborn transitional period. To improve newborn outcomes, implementation of evidence-based research was initiated to foster practice change. The research of skin-to-skin practice directly correlated the need to review newborn care and practices thereof. The need to review one such practice was the newborn bath. Recognition of the importance of an uninterrupted newborn transition resulted in positive newborn outcomes and patient satisfaction. Implementation of bath delay showed that regardless of gestational age, the incidence of newborns experiencing hypothermia and hypoglycemia during the transitional period was reduced by changing the focus of unnecessary interventions.