Conceptual Models of Health Behavior: Research in the Emergency Care Settings

Authors

  • Edwin D. Boudreaux PhD,

    1. From the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School (EDB), Worcester, MA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (RC), Cleveland, OH; the Center for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital and Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, (BBoc, BBor), Providence, RI; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University (SLB), New Haven, CT.
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  • Rita Cydulka MD, MS,

    1. From the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School (EDB), Worcester, MA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (RC), Cleveland, OH; the Center for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital and Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, (BBoc, BBor), Providence, RI; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University (SLB), New Haven, CT.
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  • Beth Bock PhD,

    1. From the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School (EDB), Worcester, MA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (RC), Cleveland, OH; the Center for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital and Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, (BBoc, BBor), Providence, RI; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University (SLB), New Haven, CT.
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  • Belinda Borrelli PhD,

    1. From the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School (EDB), Worcester, MA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (RC), Cleveland, OH; the Center for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital and Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, (BBoc, BBor), Providence, RI; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University (SLB), New Haven, CT.
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  • Steven L. Bernstein MD

    1. From the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School (EDB), Worcester, MA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (RC), Cleveland, OH; the Center for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital and Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, (BBoc, BBor), Providence, RI; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University (SLB), New Haven, CT.
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  • This work is the output from a consensus workshop entitled “Conceptual Models of Health Behavior” conducted during the May 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference in New Orleans, LA: “Public Health in the ED: Surveillance, Screening, and Intervention.”

  • Workshop attendees were as follows: Srikar Adhibari, Thomas Chun, Richard Denisco, Lowell Gerson, Coleen Kalynyen, Regina Kovach, Cheryl King, Gregory Luke Larkin, Melanie Lippman, Laurence Melnicker, and Robert C. Solomon.

Address for correspondence and reprints: Edwin D. Boudreaux, PhD; e-mail: Edwin.Boudreaux@umassmed.edu.

Abstract

This article provides recommendations for incorporating conceptual models of health behavior change into research conducted in emergency care settings. The authors drafted a set of preliminary recommendations, which were reviewed and discussed by a panel of experienced investigators attending the 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference. The original recommendations were expanded and refined based on their input. This article reports the final recommendations. Three recommendations were made: 1) research conducted in emergency care settings that focuses on health behaviors should be grounded in formal conceptual models, 2) investigators should clearly operationalize their outcomes of interest, and 3) expected relations between theoretical constructs and outcomes should be made explicit prior to initiating a study. A priori hypothesis generation grounded in conceptual models of health behavior, followed by empirical validation of these hypotheses, is needed to improve preventive and public health–related interventions in emergency care settings.

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