Violence Prevention in the Emergency Department: Future Research Priorities

Authors

  • Debra Houry MD, MPH,

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Center for Injury Control, Emory University (DH), Atlanta, GA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Injury Research Center, and the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan (RMC), Ann Arbor, MI; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AH), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston Medical Center (TJ, EB), Boston, MA; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, the Injury Research Center, and the Firearm Injury Center, Medical College of Wisconsin (SH), Milwaukee, WI.
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  • Rebecca M. Cunningham MD,

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Center for Injury Control, Emory University (DH), Atlanta, GA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Injury Research Center, and the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan (RMC), Ann Arbor, MI; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AH), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston Medical Center (TJ, EB), Boston, MA; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, the Injury Research Center, and the Firearm Injury Center, Medical College of Wisconsin (SH), Milwaukee, WI.
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  • Abigail Hankin MD, MPH,

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Center for Injury Control, Emory University (DH), Atlanta, GA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Injury Research Center, and the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan (RMC), Ann Arbor, MI; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AH), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston Medical Center (TJ, EB), Boston, MA; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, the Injury Research Center, and the Firearm Injury Center, Medical College of Wisconsin (SH), Milwaukee, WI.
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  • Thea James MD,

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Center for Injury Control, Emory University (DH), Atlanta, GA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Injury Research Center, and the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan (RMC), Ann Arbor, MI; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AH), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston Medical Center (TJ, EB), Boston, MA; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, the Injury Research Center, and the Firearm Injury Center, Medical College of Wisconsin (SH), Milwaukee, WI.
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  • Edward Bernstein MD,

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Center for Injury Control, Emory University (DH), Atlanta, GA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Injury Research Center, and the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan (RMC), Ann Arbor, MI; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AH), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston Medical Center (TJ, EB), Boston, MA; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, the Injury Research Center, and the Firearm Injury Center, Medical College of Wisconsin (SH), Milwaukee, WI.
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  • Stephen Hargarten MD, MPH

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Center for Injury Control, Emory University (DH), Atlanta, GA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Injury Research Center, and the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan (RMC), Ann Arbor, MI; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AH), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston Medical Center (TJ, EB), Boston, MA; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, the Injury Research Center, and the Firearm Injury Center, Medical College of Wisconsin (SH), Milwaukee, WI.
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  • This work is the output from a consensus workshop conducted during the May 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference in New Orleans, LA: “Public Health in the ED: Surveillance, Screening, and Intervention.”

Address for correspondence and reprints: Debra Houry, MD, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine, Center for Injury Control, Emory University, 49 Jesse Hill Jr Dr SE, Atlanta, GA 30303; E-mail dhoury@emory.edu.

Abstract

The 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference working group session participants developed recommendations and research questions for violence prevention in the emergency department (ED). A writing group devised a working draft prior to the meeting and presented this to the breakout session at the consensus conference for input and approval. The recommendations include: 1) promote and facilitate the collection of standardized information related to violence victimization and perpetration in ED settings; 2) develop and validate brief practical screening instruments that can identify those at risk for perpetration of violence toward others or toward self; 3) develop and validate brief practical screening instruments that can identify victims at risk for violent reinjury and mental health sequelae; and 4) conduct efficacy, translational, and dissemination research on interventions for violence prevention. The work group emphasized the critical need and role of ED-based research to impact surveillance and prevention of future violence-related injury.

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