Research Priorities for Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Sexually Transmitted Infections Surveillance, Screening, and Intervention in Emergency Departments: Consensus-based Recommendations

Authors

  • Jason S. Haukoos MD, MSc,

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, the Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, and the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine (JSH), Aurora, CO; the Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois Chicago School of Public Health (SDM), Chicago, IL; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University (LH, RER), Baltimore, MD; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Jacobi Medical Center, and Albert Einstein College of Medicine (YC), Bronx, NY.
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  • Supriya D. Mehta PhD, MHS,

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, the Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, and the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine (JSH), Aurora, CO; the Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois Chicago School of Public Health (SDM), Chicago, IL; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University (LH, RER), Baltimore, MD; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Jacobi Medical Center, and Albert Einstein College of Medicine (YC), Bronx, NY.
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  • Leah Harvey,

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, the Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, and the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine (JSH), Aurora, CO; the Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois Chicago School of Public Health (SDM), Chicago, IL; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University (LH, RER), Baltimore, MD; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Jacobi Medical Center, and Albert Einstein College of Medicine (YC), Bronx, NY.
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  • Yvette Calderon MD, MS,

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, the Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, and the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine (JSH), Aurora, CO; the Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois Chicago School of Public Health (SDM), Chicago, IL; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University (LH, RER), Baltimore, MD; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Jacobi Medical Center, and Albert Einstein College of Medicine (YC), Bronx, NY.
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  • Richard E. Rothman MD, PhD

    1. From the Department of Emergency Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, the Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, and the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine (JSH), Aurora, CO; the Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois Chicago School of Public Health (SDM), Chicago, IL; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University (LH, RER), Baltimore, MD; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Jacobi Medical Center, and Albert Einstein College of Medicine (YC), Bronx, NY.
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  • Supported in part by an Independent Scientist Award (K02 HS017526) from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (JSH), an unrestricted grant from Abbott Laboratories (SDM), a Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (K23 HD054315) from the National Institutes of Health (YC), and a Health Sciences Grant from Gilead Sciences (RER).

  • This work is the output from the Sexually Transmitted Infections/HIV consensus workshop conducted during the May 2009 AEM Consensus Conference in New Orleans, LA: “Public Health in the ED: Surveillance, Screening, and Intervention.”

  • The authors thank the following consensus conference participants (listed in alphabetical order): Eileen Couture, Ethan Cowan, Charles Delgado, M. Kit Delgado, James Heffelfinger (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), Brooke Hoots (University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill), Shkelzen Hoxhaj, Nina Joyce, Beth Kaplan, Mike Lyons, Ken Malone, Nancy Miertschin, Joan Miller (Health Research & Education Trust), Patricia Mitchell (Boston University), Michelle Mott (Emory University), Matt Prekker, Carla Pruden, Mandy Roberts, Richard Sattin, Stephen Wall, and Lee Wilbur.

Address for correspondence and reprints: Jason S. Haukoos, MD, MSc; e-mail: Jason.Haukoos@dhha.org.

Abstract

This article describes the results of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STI) prevention in the emergency department (ED) component of the 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference entitled “Public Health in the ED: Surveillance, Screening, and Intervention.” The objectives were to use experts to define knowledge gaps and priority research questions related to the performance of HIV and STI surveillance, screening, and intervention in the ED. A four-step nominal group technique was applied using national and international experts in HIV and STI prevention. Using electronic mail, an in-person meeting, and a Web-based survey, specific knowledge gaps and research questions were identified and prioritized. Through two rounds of nomination and refinement, followed by two rounds of election, consensus was achieved for 11 knowledge gaps and 14 research questions related to HIV and STI prevention in EDs. The overarching themes of the research priority questions were related to effectiveness, sustainability, and integration. While the knowledge gaps appear disparate from one another, they are related to the research priority questions identified. Using a consensus approach, we developed a set of priorities for future research related to HIV and STI prevention in the ED. These priorities have the potential to improve future clinical and health services research and extramural funding in this important public health sector.

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