Generational Influences in Academic Emergency Medicine: Teaching and Learning, Mentoring, and Technology (Part I)

Authors

  • Nicholas M. Mohr MD,

    1. From the Division of Emergency Medicine and the Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St. Louis (NMM), St. Louis, MO; the Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, and the Department of Genetics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LMW), New Orleans, LA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AMM), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University (PHB), Portland, OR; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California at San Francisco (SBP), San Francisco, CA.
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  • Lisa Moreno-Walton MD, MS,

    1. From the Division of Emergency Medicine and the Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St. Louis (NMM), St. Louis, MO; the Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, and the Department of Genetics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LMW), New Orleans, LA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AMM), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University (PHB), Portland, OR; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California at San Francisco (SBP), San Francisco, CA.
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  • Angela M. Mills MD,

    1. From the Division of Emergency Medicine and the Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St. Louis (NMM), St. Louis, MO; the Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, and the Department of Genetics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LMW), New Orleans, LA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AMM), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University (PHB), Portland, OR; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California at San Francisco (SBP), San Francisco, CA.
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  • Patrick H. Brunett MD,

    1. From the Division of Emergency Medicine and the Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St. Louis (NMM), St. Louis, MO; the Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, and the Department of Genetics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LMW), New Orleans, LA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AMM), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University (PHB), Portland, OR; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California at San Francisco (SBP), San Francisco, CA.
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  • Susan B. Promes MD,

    1. From the Division of Emergency Medicine and the Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St. Louis (NMM), St. Louis, MO; the Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, and the Department of Genetics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LMW), New Orleans, LA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (AMM), Philadelphia, PA; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University (PHB), Portland, OR; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California at San Francisco (SBP), San Francisco, CA.
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  • on behalf of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues in Academic Emergency Medicine Task Force


  • Approval: This SAEM Aging and Generational Issues in Academic Emergency Medicine Task Force Report was approved by the SAEM Board of Directors in May 2010.

  • Disclosures: Dr. Moreno-Walton’s work is supported by grants from Louisiana Clinical Translational Research, Education, and Commercialization Project; the Louisiana State Board of Regents; and the National Institutes of Health Research Supplement to Promote Diversity on Health-Related Research.

  • Supervising Editor: Mark Mycyk, MD.

Address for correspondence and reprints: Nicholas M. Mohr, MD; e-mail: mohrn@wustl.edu.

Abstract

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE 2011; 18:190–199 © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Abstract

For the first time in history, four generations are working together—traditionalists, baby boomers, generation Xers (Gen Xers), and millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another.

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