Using Information Technology to Improve the Quality and Safety of Emergency Care

Authors

  • Daniel A. Handel MD, MPH,

    1. From the Center for Policy and Research in Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University (DAH), Portland, OR; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida (RLW), Jacksonville, FL; the Clinical Safety Research Unit, Imperial College (RLW), London, UK; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School (LAN), Boston, MA; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, George Washington University School of Medicine, and Department of Health Policy, George Washington School of Public Health (JMP), Washington, DC.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Robert L. Wears MD, MS,

    1. From the Center for Policy and Research in Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University (DAH), Portland, OR; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida (RLW), Jacksonville, FL; the Clinical Safety Research Unit, Imperial College (RLW), London, UK; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School (LAN), Boston, MA; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, George Washington University School of Medicine, and Department of Health Policy, George Washington School of Public Health (JMP), Washington, DC.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Larry A. Nathanson MD,

    1. From the Center for Policy and Research in Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University (DAH), Portland, OR; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida (RLW), Jacksonville, FL; the Clinical Safety Research Unit, Imperial College (RLW), London, UK; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School (LAN), Boston, MA; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, George Washington University School of Medicine, and Department of Health Policy, George Washington School of Public Health (JMP), Washington, DC.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE

    1. From the Center for Policy and Research in Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University (DAH), Portland, OR; the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida (RLW), Jacksonville, FL; the Clinical Safety Research Unit, Imperial College (RLW), London, UK; the Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School (LAN), Boston, MA; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, George Washington University School of Medicine, and Department of Health Policy, George Washington School of Public Health (JMP), Washington, DC.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by 1R13HS018114-01 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

  • The authors have no relevant financial information or potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

  • Supervising Editor: Mark Hauswald, MD.

Address for correspondence and reprints: Daniel A. Handel, MD, MPH; e-mail: handeld@ohsu.edu.

Abstract

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE 2011; 18:e45–e51 © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Abstract

With the 2010 federal health care reform passage, a renewed focus has emerged for the integration of electronic health records (EHRs) into the U.S. health care system. A consensus conference in October 2009 met to discuss the future research agenda with regard to using information technology (IT) to improve the future quality and safety of emergency department (ED) care. The literature is mixed as to how the use of computerized provider order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support (CDS), EHRs, and patient tracking systems has improved or degraded the safety and quality of ED care. Such mixed findings must be considered in the national push for rapid implementation of health IT. We present a research agenda addressing the major questions that are posed by the introduction of IT into ED care; these questions relate to interoperability, patient flow and integration into clinical work, real-time decision support, handoffs, safety-critical computing, and the interaction between IT systems and clinical workflows.

Ancillary