Performance Evaluation and Optimization of Multiplex PCRs for the Highly Discriminating OSU 10-Locus Set Y-STRs

Authors

  • Erin Hanson Ph.D.,

    1. Graduate Program in Biomolecular Science, University of Central Florida, P.O. Box 162366, Orlando, FL 32816-2366.
    2. National Center for Forensic Science, P.O. Box 162367, Orlando, FL 32816-2367.
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  • Julie L. Maybruck Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Molecular Genetics, The Ohio State University, 484 W. 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210.
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  • Jack Ballantyne Ph.D.,

    1. Graduate Program in Biomolecular Science, University of Central Florida, P.O. Box 162366, Orlando, FL 32816-2366.
    2. National Center for Forensic Science, P.O. Box 162367, Orlando, FL 32816-2367.
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  • Paul A. Fuerst Ph.D.

    1. Department of Molecular Genetics, The Ohio State University, 484 W. 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210.
    2. Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University, 318 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210.
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  • The points of view in this document are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • This study was supported by a research award from The Ohio State University. In addition, portions of this work were supported under Award number 2005-MU-MU-K044 from the Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice, Department of Justice.

Additional information and reprint requests:
Paul A. Fuerst, Ph.D.
Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology
The Ohio State University
Rm. 300 Aronoff Laboratory
318 West 12th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210
E-mail: fuerst.1@osu.edu

Abstract

Abstract:  In a previous study, a new set of Y-chromosome short tandem repeats, the OSU 10-locus set (MPM1 and MPM2), was shown to have a higher discrimination power when evaluated against the 10 SWGDAM loci on a common population panel. Here, we describe the optimization of the multiplex reactions using dye-labeled primers followed by performance evaluations. The loci exhibited high precision, human male specificity, reliability in different body fluids, high sensitivity, stability, and the ability to amplify nonprobative casework and mixture samples. Stutter for the all of the loci, with the exception of the highly polymorphic locus DYS688, was similar to that observed for autosomal loci. The results of the performance evaluations reinforced the utility of these loci.

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