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Comparison of Bulk and Compound-Specific δ13C Isotope Ratio Analyses for the Discrimination Between Cannabis Samples

Authors

  • Zeland Muccio Ph.D.,

    1. Center for Intelligent Chemical Instrumentation, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701-2979.
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  • Claudia Wöckel M.S.,

    1. Center for Intelligent Chemical Instrumentation, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701-2979.
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  • Yan An M.S.,

    1. Center for Intelligent Chemical Instrumentation, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701-2979.
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  • Glen P. Jackson Ph.D.

    1. Center for Intelligent Chemical Instrumentation, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701-2979.
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  • Funding received from the National Science Foundation (0745590).

Additional information and reprint requests:
Glen P. Jackson, Ph.D.
175 Clippinger Laboratories
Ohio University
Athens, OH 45701-2979
E-mail: jacksong@ohio.edu

Abstract

Abstract:  Five marijuana samples were compared using bulk isotope analysis compound-specific isotope ratio analysis of the extracted cannabinoids. Owing to the age of our cannabis samples, four of the five samples were compared using the isotope ratios of cannabinol (CBN), a stable degradation product of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Bulk δ13C isotope analysis discriminated between all five samples at the 95% confidence level. Compound-specific δ13C isotope analysis could not distinguish between one pair of the five samples at the 95% confidence level. All the measured cannabinoids showed significant depletion in 13C relative to bulk isotope values; the isotope ratios for THC, CBN, and cannabidiol were on average 1.6‰, 1.7‰, and 2.2‰ more negative than the bulk values, respectively. A more detailed investigation needs to be conducted to assess the degree fractionation between the different cannabinoids, especially after aging.

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