LEARNING APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY IN FIELD SCHOOLS: LESSONS FROM BOSNIA AND ROMANIA

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Abstract

This chapter illustrates how principles of applied anthropology can be learned through ethnographic or “cultural” field schools. Aside from a well-rounded classroom education, aspiring applied anthropologists ideally should have substantial “experience in the field” before graduating, either through individualized experiences (the more common approach), or through group experiences. The chapter focuses on the latter, and discusses how such field experiences can enhance a student's emerging undergraduate or graduate career track. In addition, using two complementary types of field school (Project Bosnia and Project Romania, both at the University of Denver), the author addresses the concept of pragmatic humanitarianism, as well as the benefits of hands-on group experiences of this nature for students and civil society at large.

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