Testing the function of the domed nests of Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrows

Authors

  • Selena Humphreys,

    Corresponding author
    1. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut, 75 North Eagleville Road, U-43, Storrs, Connecticut, 06269, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Chris S. Elphick,

    Corresponding author
    1. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut, 75 North Eagleville Road, U-43, Storrs, Connecticut, 06269, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Carina Gjerdrum,

    Corresponding author
    1. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut, 75 North Eagleville Road, U-43, Storrs, Connecticut, 06269, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Margaret Rubega

    1. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut, 75 North Eagleville Road, U-43, Storrs, Connecticut, 06269, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Current address: P.O. Box 13602, Jackson, WY 83002.

Current address: Environment Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, 45 Alderney Drive, 16th Floor, Dartmouth, NS, B2Y 2N6, Canada.

Corresponding author. Email: chris.elphick@uconn.edu

Abstract

ABSTRACT Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrows (Ammodramus caudacutus) build ground nests, often with a closely-woven dome, in marshes that frequently flood during high tides. To test the hypothesis that domed nests help reduce the loss of eggs and chicks due to flooding or predation, we examined the characteristics and fate of 102 nests at sites along the coast of Connecticut. To test whether nest structure was tailored to suit microhabitat conditions, we also measured vegetation characteristics around nests. Finally, we conducted artificial nest-flooding experiments to determine whether removal of domes reduced egg retention during flooding. We found no significant effects of nest structure on breeding success or failure, and few significant correlations between nest structure and microhabitat. The height of nests above the ground, however, increased with vegetation height, supporting the hypothesis that nest construction is influenced by flooding, but not supporting the hypothesis that predation risk is important. Dome removal experiments showed that domes have a highly significant effect on the retention of eggs during flooding, suggesting that domes help eggs survive the regular tidal flooding of marshes.

SINOPSIS

El gorrión (Ammodramus caudacutus) utiliza anegados que frecuentemente se inundan durante la marea alta y en estos habitats construye nidos en el suelo, por lo general con domos tejidos. Para probar la hipótesis de que los nidos con domos ayudan a reducir la depredación y la pérdida de huevos y pichones durante inundaciones, examinamos las características y el destino de 102 nidos en diferentes localidades a lo largo de la costa de Connecticut. Para probar si la estructura del nido estaba a la medida de las condiciones microclimáticas, también medimos las características de la vegetación en los alrededores del nido. Finalmente, llevamos a cabo experimentos de inundaciones artificiales, para determinar si la remoción del domo afectaba la retención de huevos durante inundaciones. No encontramos efectos significativos de la estructura del nido en el éxito reproductivo o fracaso de los nidos, y pocas correlaciones significativas entre la estructura y el microhabitat. La altura de los nidos del suelo, se incrementó con la altura de la vegetación, lo que apoya la hipótesis de que la construcción de nidos es influenciada por las inundaciones. La hipótesis de protección contra la depredación no tuvo apoyo con los datos tomados. Los experimentos de la remoción del domo indicaron que la estructura tiene un efecto significativo en la retención de huevos durante inundaciones, lo que sugiere que los domos ayudan a que los huevos superen el periodo regular de inundación en los anegados.

Ancillary