Get access

Age- and sex-dependent spring arrival dates of Eastern Kingbirds

Authors

  • Nathan W. Cooper,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biology, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, Oregon 97207, USA
      Corresponding author. Current address: Department of Ecology and Evolution, Boggs 400, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA. Email: nathanwands@hotmail.com
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michael T. Murphy,

    1. Department of Biology, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, Oregon 97207, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lucas J. Redmond

    1. Department of Biology, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, Oregon 97207, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Corresponding author. Current address: Department of Ecology and Evolution, Boggs 400, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA. Email: nathanwands@hotmail.com

Abstract

ABSTRACT Among migratory passerines, the first birds to arrive on the breeding grounds are usually older males. Early arrival by older birds may be driven by experience, age-dependent changes in body condition, age-dependent access to resources during the nonbreeding period, or latitudinal segregation by age. Males may arrive earlier than females (protandry) because males maintain better condition due to greater access to resources during the winter, or because selection favors early arriving males that acquire the best territories or experience enhanced mating opportunities. During a 4-yr study (2004–2007) in Oregon, we found that older Eastern Kingbirds (Tyrannus tyrannus), regardless of sex, arrived nearly a week before younger birds and that males arrived about 5 d before females. Age- and sex-dependent arrival dates do not appear to be related to differences in body condition, social dominance in winter, or latitudinal segregation, and protandry is unrelated to the ability of early-arriving males to acquire high-quality territories. Instead, we propose that young birds have less to gain from early arrival because of their probable inability to displace experienced birds from prime territories and that protandry evolved due to enhanced mating opportunities for early arriving males that arise from the high rates of extra-pair matings in our population of Eastern Kingbirds.

RESUMEN

Entre los migrantes paserinos, los primeros individuos en arribar a las áreas de reproducción son usualmente los machos viejos. El arribo temprano de los individuos viejos puede estar influenciado por la experiencia, cambios en la condición corporal dependiente de la edad, acceso a recursos durante la época no reproductiva dependiente de la edad, o segregación latitudinal por edades. El arribo temprano de los machos en comparación con las hembras (protandria) existe posiblemente porque los machos mantienen una mejor condición debido a un mayor acceso a recursos durante el invierno, o puede haber evolucionado porque los machos que arriban temprano adquieren los mejores territorios o presentan incremento en oportunidades de apareamiento. Durante un estudio de cuatro años (2004–2007) en Oregon, encontramos que individuos viejos del Eastern Kingbirds (Tyrannus tyrannus), sin importar el sexo, arribaron casi una semana antes que los individuos jóvenes y que los machos arribaron al rededor de cinco días antes que las hembras. Las fechas de arribo dependientes de la edad y el sexo no parecen estar relacionados con diferencias en las condiciones corporales, dominancia social durante el invierno o segregación latitudinal y la protandria no esta relacionada con la habilidad de los machos de arribar tempranamente para adquirir territorios de alta calidad. En vez, nosotros proponemos que las aves jóvenes tienen menos que ganar con el arribo temprano debido a la probable inhabilidad de desplazar a los individuos experimentados de los habitas primarios, y que la protandria evoluciono para incrementar oportunidades de apareamiento de los machos que llegan temprano los cuales sobresalen por sus altas tasas de copula extra pareja en nuestra población de Eastern Kingbirds.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary