WOLBACHIA INFECTION AND DRAMATIC INTRASPECIFIC MITOCHONDRIAL DNA DIVERGENCE IN A FIG WASP

Authors

  • Jin-Hua Xiao,

    1. Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
    2. These authors contribute equally
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  • Ning-Xin Wang,

    1. These authors contribute equally
    2. College of Plant Protection, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai’an 271018, China
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  • Robert W. Murphy,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China
    2. Department of Natural History, Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen's Park, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2C6, Canada
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  • James Cook,

    1. School of Biological Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, Berkshire, RG6 6BX, United Kingdom
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  • Ling-Yi Jia,

    1. Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
    2. Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China
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  • Da-Wei Huang

    1. Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
    2. College of Plant Protection, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai’an 271018, China
    3. E-mail: huangdw@ioz.ac.cn
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Abstract

Mitochondria and Wolbachia are maternally inherited genomes that exhibit strong linkage disequilibrium in many organisms. We surveyed Wolbachia infections in 187 specimens of the fig wasp species, Ceratosolen solmsi, and found an infection prevalence of 89.3%. DNA sequencing of 20 individuals each from Wolbachia-infected and -uninfected subpopulations revealed extreme mtDNA divergence (up to 9.2% and 15.3% in CO1 and cytochrome b, respectively) between infected and uninfected wasps. Further, mtDNA diversity was significantly reduced within the infected group. Our sequencing of a large part of the mitochondrial genome from both Wolbachia-infected and -uninfected individuals revealed that high sequence divergence is common throughout the mitochondrial genome. These patterns suggest a partial selective sweep of mitochondria subsequent to the introduction of Wolbachia into C. solsmi, by hybrid introgression from a related species.

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