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    Charles A. Goodsell, Scott D. Gronlund, Jeffrey S. Neuschatz, Investigating mug shot commitment, Psychology, Crime & Law, 2014, 1

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    Tim Valentine, Josh P Davis, Amina Memon, Andrew Roberts, Live Showups and Their Influence on a Subsequent Video Line-up, Applied Cognitive Psychology, 2012, 26, 1
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    Kally J. Nelson, Cara Laney, Nicci Bowman Fowler, Eric D. Knowles, Deborah Davis, Elizabeth F. Loftus, Change blindness can cause mistaken eyewitness identification, Legal and Criminological Psychology, 2011, 16, 1
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    Charles A. Goodsell, Jeffrey S. Neuschatz, Scott D. Gronlund, Effects of mugshot commitment on lineup performance in young and older adults, Applied Cognitive Psychology, 2009, 23, 6
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    Michelle R. Blunt, Hunter A. McAllister, Mug shot exposure effects: Does size matter?, Law and Human Behavior, 2009, 33, 2, 175

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    Gary L. Wells, Deah S. Quinlivan, Suggestive eyewitness identification procedures and the Supreme Court's reliability test in light of eyewitness science: 30 years later., Law and Human Behavior, 2009, 33, 1, 1

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    Kathy Pezdek, Kathryn Sperry, Shana M. Owens, Interviewing witnesses: The effect of forced confabulation on event memory., Law and Human Behavior, 2007, 31, 5, 463

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    Ryann M. Haw, Jason J. Dickinson, Christian A. Meissner, The phenomenology of carryover effects between show-up and line-up identification, Memory, 2007, 15, 1, 117

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    Kenneth A. Deffenbacher, Brian H. Bornstein, Steven D. Penrod, Mugshot Exposure Effects: Retroactive Interference, Mugshot Commitment, Source Confusion, and Unconscious Transference., Law and Human Behavior, 2006, 30, 3, 287

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    Dawn J. Dekle, Viewing composite sketches: lineups and showups compared, Applied Cognitive Psychology, 2006, 20, 3
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    Kathy Pezdek, Iris Blandon-Gitlin, When is an intervening line-up most likely to affect eyewitness identification accuracy?, Legal and Criminological Psychology, 2005, 10, 2
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    Amina Memon, Lorraine Hope, James Bartlett, Ray Bull, Eyewitness recognition errors: The effects of mugshot viewing and choosing in young and old adults, Memory & Cognition, 2002, 30, 8, 1219

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    Jennifer E. Dysart, R. C. L. Lindsay, Robin Hammond, Paul Dupuis, Mug shot exposure prior to lineup identification: Interference, transference, and commitment effects., Journal of Applied Psychology, 2001, 86, 6, 1280

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    Christian A. Meissner, John C. Brigham, Colleen M. Kelley, The influence of retrieval processes in verbal overshadowing, Memory & Cognition, 2001, 29, 1, 176

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    Sean Pryke, R. C. L. Lindsay, Joanna D. Pozzulo, Sorting mug shots: methodological issues, Applied Cognitive Psychology, 2000, 14, 1
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    Rogers Elliott, Expert testimony about eyewitness identification: A critique., Law and Human Behavior, 1993, 17, 4, 423

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    Kenneth A. Deffenbacher, A Maturing of Research on the Behaviour of Eyewitnesses, Applied Cognitive Psychology, 1991, 5, 5
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    Gänter Köhnken, Maria Fiedler, Charlotte Möhlenbeck, Psychology and Law,