Ethical Intentions and the Theories of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior1

Authors

  • Nancy B. Kurland

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    1. University of Southern California
      Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Nancy B. Kurland, Department of Management & Organization, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089–1421. e-mail: nkurland@kecknet.usc.edu.
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  • 1

    This article is one product of my dissertation research. I thank the President of the company who allowed me access to his company and who wishes to remain anonymous. Also I am indebted to my committee members for their guidance and insights: William C. Frederick, Irene Frieze, Robbin Deny, Ralph Kilmann, and Barry Mitnick. I especially acknowledge Bill's and Irene's efforts and support throughout the process.

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Nancy B. Kurland, Department of Management & Organization, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089–1421. e-mail: nkurland@kecknet.usc.edu.

Abstract

This study compares the explanatory power of Fishbein and Ajzen's (1991) theory of reasoned action, Ajzen's (1975) theory of planned behavior, and a modified version of the theory of planned behavior, which includes a measure of moral obligation, to predict insurance agents' e]thical intentions toward their clients. Two hundred and forty-five insurance agents in the U.S. were sent surveys, and with 59% of them responding, results suggest that the modified version of the theory of planned behavior best explains agents' e]thical intentions. Theoretical considerations and suggestions for future research, highlighting the perceived behavioral control and moral obligation constructs, are provided.

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