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This study tested the hypothesis that female faces can trigger consensual stereotypical responses about battered women in observers. In Part 1, participants rated the physical attractiveness, likeability, and distinctiveness of 60 facial photographs of white adult women. In Part 2, a separate group of subjects either rated personality traits or gave free form descriptions of 16 women that were selected from Part 1. Half of the participants in Part 2 were then asked to choose two photographs of women who most likely fitted the stereotype of a battered woman and two women who least likely fitted the stereotype of a battered woman. The remaining participants were asked to choose two photographs of battered women who were least likely to kill their abuser and two women who were most likely to kill their abuser. Chi-square analysis of subjects' c]hoices indicated that selections were significantly nonrandom. Women categorized, as most likely to be battered and most likely to kill their abuser were judged less physically attractive and less likeable. Perceived traits of battered women considered least likely to kill their abuser most consistently reflected a layperson's stereotypes of battered women. Free form descriptions of facial stimuli failed to reveal any significant differences among the four battered women categories. The results were discussed in terms of the probability that facial stereotyping of battered women is a factor in social and legal decision making.