Birth Control Versus AIDS Prevention: A Hierarchical Model of Condom Use Among Young People1

Authors

  • Jost Reinecke,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Sociology Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany
      Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Jost Reinecke, Institut für Soziologie/Sozialpädagogik, Universität Miinster, Scharnhorststraze 121 D-48151 Münster, Germany. e-mail: reineck@uni-muenster.de.
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  • Peter Schmidt,

    1. Zentrum für Umfragen und Analysen (ZUMA) Mannheim germany
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  • Icek Ajzen

    1. University of Massachusetts, Amherst
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  • 1

    The research reported in this article was supported in part by a fellowship of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft to Jost Reinecke and by a grant from the Bundesministerium für Forschung und Technologie, No. V-017-90.

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Jost Reinecke, Institut für Soziologie/Sozialpädagogik, Universität Miinster, Scharnhorststraze 121 D-48151 Münster, Germany. e-mail: reineck@uni-muenster.de.

Abstract

The authors report the results of a nationwide survey of young people in Germany which applied the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1985, 1991) to condom use for purposes of birth control and with new sexual partners (to prevent AIDS). A hierarchical model, in which the 2 functions of condom use were treated as separate 2nd-order factors, was found to be superior to a single-factor model. The hierarchical model also provided evidence for the convergent and discriminant validities of indicators used to assess the constructs in the theory of planned behavior. Attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of behavioral control all made significant contributions to the predictions of intentions, accounting for 62.0% and 70.9% of the variance for birth control and AIDS prevention, respectively. Perceived behavioral control carried most of the weight in the former prediction, while attitudes carried most of the weight in the latter. Implications of these findings are discussed.

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