Ethnicity, Idiocentrism–Allocentrism, and Intergroup Attitudes1

Authors

  • Lynn Lee,

    1. Department of Social Work and Psychology National University of Singapore, Singapore
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  • Colleen Ward

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Social Work and Psychology National University of Singapore, Singapore
      Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Colleen Ward, Department of Social Work and Psychology, National University of Singapore, Kent Ridge, Singapore 119260.
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  • 1

    The research was undertaken as an undergraduate research project by the first author under the supervision of the second author.

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Colleen Ward, Department of Social Work and Psychology, National University of Singapore, Kent Ridge, Singapore 119260.

Abstract

The study examined the relationships among ethnicity, idiocentrism–allocentrism and intergroup attitudes in Singapore. Thirty Malay and 30 Chinese students completed questionnaires which measured in-group and out-group attitudes and attitudes toward ethnic-based community development groups. Intergroup attitudes were analyzed by a 2 × 2 × 2 (Subject Ethnicity × Target Group Ethnicity × Idiocentrism–Allocentrism) analysis of variance. A 2 × 2 interaction revealed that both Malay and Chinese subjects expressed ethnocentric biases; however, planned comparisons indicated that this was due to the responses of allocentrics. A separate 2 × 2 (Subject Ethnicity × Idiocentrism-Allocentrism) ANOVA further revealed that allocentrics had more favorable attitudes toward ethnic-based community development groups than did idiocentrics.

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