Self-Supervisor Agreement: The Influence of Feedback Seeking on the Relationship Between Self and Supervisor Ratings of Performance1

Authors

  • JANE R. WILLIAMS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis
      2 Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Jane R. Williams, Department of Psychology, Indiana University, Purdue University-Indianapolis, LD 124, 402 North Blackford Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202–3275.
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  • MICHAEL A. JOHNSON

    1. Purdue University
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  • 1

    The authors would like to thank Jeanne Morris for help in collecting data, and John T. Hazer. Scott Highhouse. and Paul E. Levy for their comments on earlier drafts of this manuscript.

2 Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Jane R. Williams, Department of Psychology, Indiana University, Purdue University-Indianapolis, LD 124, 402 North Blackford Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202–3275.

Abstract

Self-assessment research has continued to search for those factors that increase self-other rating agreement. The current field study investigated the feedback-seeking strategies (i. e., monitoring and inquiry) used by 125 employees to obtain performance information, as well as the relationship between feedback-seeking strategy use and self-supervisor performance-rating agreement. Results indicate that the frequency of monitoring reported by employees significantly moderated the relationship between self and supervisor ratings of performance. Individuals who reported higher levels of feedback seeking through monitoring were more likely to have self-assessments that were congruent with their supervisors' ratings of performance.

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