The Impact of Alcohol on Negotiator Behavior: Experimental Evidence1

Authors

  • Maurice E. Schweitzer,

    Corresponding author
    1. Wharton School University of Pennsylvania
      Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Maurice Schweitzer, 1300 SHDH, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104. e-mail: Schweitz@wharton.upenn.edu
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  • Leslie E. Gomberg

    1. Barry University
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  • 1

    We thank Jonathan Baron, Gérard Cachon, Colin Camerer, Rachel Croson, John Hershey, Howard Kunreuther, and two anonymous reviewers for helpful comments. We thank Roxanne Campbell, Diana Diaz-Luong, and Jeanine Gubler for research assistance.

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Maurice Schweitzer, 1300 SHDH, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104. e-mail: Schweitz@wharton.upenn.edu

Abstract

Business-related drinking is an important organizational and managerial activity with particular relevance to the negotiation process. This paper investigates the influence of a moderate amount of alcohol on negotiator behavior and negotiated outcomes. We conducted 2 negotiation studies involving inebriated and sober participants, and found that inebriated negotiators used more aggressive tactics, made more mistakes, and reached less integrative agreements than did sober negotiators. Across both studies, we found that inebriated negotiators were unaware that alcohol had affected their negotiations.

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