SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

This study assessed a number of potential predictors of host-country and ethnic-group identification of members of immigrant groups to Australia. The study included 281 adult participants from Vietnam, Hong Kong, and New Zealand, who responded to questions relating to their acculturation attitudes, host-culture and ethnic-group identification, and experiences in their new country. Results showed that the predictors of host country (Australian) identification were the immigrants' acculturation attitude of wanting to live according to host standards and values, lower ethnic versus Australian social involvement, lower ethnic prejudice, higher job status, and acceptance by Australians. The major predictors of ethnic-group identification were an acculturation attitude of wanting to live according to ethnic-group standards, higher ethnic versus Australian social involvement, lower self-esteem, fewer Australian friends, lower ability to speak English, higher education, lower self-efficacy, and number of ethnic friends. The implications for the acculturation of immigrants are discussed.