The Relationship Between School-Leisure Conflict and Educational and Mental Health Indexes: A Motivational Analysis

Authors

  • Catherine F. Ratelle,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculté des sciences de I‘éducation Université Laval Québec, Canada
      Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Catherine F. Ratelle, Faculté des sciences de ľeducation, local 946, Université Laval, Québec G1K 7P4, Canada. E-mail: Catherine.ratelle@fse.ulaval.ca
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  • Caroline Senècal,

    1. Université Laval Québéc, Canada
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  • Robert J. Vallerand,

    1. Laboratoire de recherche sur le comportement social Université du Québec à Montreal Montreal, Canada
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  • Pierre Provencher

    1. Laboratoire de recherché sur le comportement social Université du Québec à Montréal Montréal, Canada
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Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Catherine F. Ratelle, Faculté des sciences de ľeducation, local 946, Université Laval, Québec G1K 7P4, Canada. E-mail: Catherine.ratelle@fse.ulaval.ca

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to test a motivational model that explains the relationship between school-leisure conflict and indicators of educational functioning and mental health using structural equation modeling with a sample of college students. Results provided support for the proposed model. Experiencing a conflict between education and leisure contexts was negatively predicted by having a self-determined motivation for school, while self-determined motivation for leisure activities was unrelated to the experience of such a conflict. A school-leisure conflict, in turn, was associated with poorer academic consequences (poor concentration at school, academic hopelessness, few intentions of pursuing in school), which were associated with higher levels of depression and low life satisfaction. Importantly, the proposed theoretical model was supported for both men and women. Results are discussed in terms of self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985, 1991, 2000) and the hierarchical model of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation (Vallerand, 1997).

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