Childhood Experiences of Parenting and Causal Attributions for Criminal Behavior Among Young Offenders and Non-Offenders

Authors

  • Emma J. Palmer,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Health Sciences
      University of Leicester, UK
      Emma J. Palmer, Clinical Division of Psychiatry, Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester General Hospital, Gwendolen Road, Leicester, UK LE5 4PW. E-mail: ejp8@le.ac.uk
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  • Kirsty Gough

    1. HMP Woodhill, UK
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Emma J. Palmer, Clinical Division of Psychiatry, Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester General Hospital, Gwendolen Road, Leicester, UK LE5 4PW. E-mail: ejp8@le.ac.uk

Abstract

This study examined the relationships between childhood experiences of parenting and causal attributions for criminal behavior among offenders against the person, property offenders, and non-offenders. Analysis showed that non-offenders perceived their fathers to be warmer and more overprotecting than did person offenders. Person offenders perceived their mothers to be less warm than did property offenders and non-offenders, and less overprotecting than non-offenders. Mothers were perceived to be more overprotecting and warmer than fathers by all 3 groups. All 3 samples viewed a range of explanations to be important in explaining criminal behavior. No significant associations were revealed between perceptions of parenting and causal attributions for crime. Group membership was predicted by home area crime level and perceived parental emotional warmth.

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