The Trait of Curiosity as a Predictor of Emotional Intelligence

Authors

  • Nancy H. Leonard,

    1. College of Business and Economics West Virginia University
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  • Michael Harvey

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Business Administration University of Mississippi and Bond University, Australia
      Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Michael Harvey, School of Business Administration, University of Mississippi, 332 Holman Hall, Oxford, MS 38677. E-mail: mharvey@bus.olemiss.edu
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Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Michael Harvey, School of Business Administration, University of Mississippi, 332 Holman Hall, Oxford, MS 38677. E-mail: mharvey@bus.olemiss.edu

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between curiosity and emotional intelligence (EI) in a sample of graduate and undergraduate business administration students. Curiosity was assessed using the Melbourne Curiosity Inventory (Naylor, 1981) and the Curiosity and Exploration Inventory (Kashdan, Rose, & Fincham, 2004), and EI was measured using the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS; Salovey, Mayer, Goldman, Turvey, & Palfai, 1995). Results indicate a significant relationship between trait curiosity and EI. Relationships between the subscales of the 3 measures are also reported. Stepwise regression analysis indicates that trait curiosity and absorption curiosity were the best predictors of total EI; while absorption curiosity was the best predictor of attention to emotions, clarity of emotions, and repair of emotions.

Curiosity [has been] conceptualized as a positive emotional-motivation system associated with the recognition, pursuit, and self-regulation of novelty and challenge. (Kashdan, Rose, & Fincham, 2004, p. 291)

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