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Ethnicity-Related Stressors and Mental Health in Latino Americans: The Moderating Role of Parental Racial Socialization

Authors


Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Noé R. Chávez, Department of Psychology (MC 285), 1007 West Harrison Street, Room B152, Chicago, IL 60607. E-mail: nchave2@uic.edu or to Sabine Elizabeth French, Department of Psychology (MC 285), 1007 West Harrison Street, Room 1046D, Chicago, IL 60607. E-mail: sefrench@uic.edu

Abstract

The current study examined the moderating role of proactive and reactive parental racial socialization on the relationship between Latino American college students' mental health and 3 ethnicity-related stressors: perceived racial discrimination, stereotype confirmation concern, and own-group conformity pressure. In hierarchical regression, greater stereotype confirmation concern predicted more mental distress in 105 Latino American college students. Both proactive and reactive racial socialization moderated the effect of own-group conformity pressure on anxiety and loss of behavioral/emotional control. Specifically, greater proactive and reactive racial socialization predicted more mental distress under greater own-group conformity pressure. Findings are interpreted in a college environment of ethnic diversity and a context of acculturative stress.

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