Diversity, Merit, Fairness, and Discrimination Beliefs as Predictors of Support for Affirmative-Action Policy Actions1

Authors

  • Christopher L. Aberson

    Corresponding author
    1. Humboldt State University
      Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Chris Aberson, Department of Psychology, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA 95521. E-mail: CLA18@humboldt.edu
    Search for more papers by this author

  • 1

    Portions of this paper were presented at the Western Psychological Association Conferences: Vancouver, BC, May 2003; and Portland, OR, May 2005.

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Chris Aberson, Department of Psychology, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA 95521. E-mail: CLA18@humboldt.edu

Abstract

This paper explores support for hiring policies associated with affirmative action (AA) using a model including beliefs regarding the fairness of AA, merit, value of diversity, prevalence of discrimination, personal self-interest, and demographic characteristics. Participants (n = 212) evaluated 8 hiring policies ranging from the use of strong preferential treatment to race-blind policies. Beliefs affected support for policies differently. For example, diversity valuation predicted support for policies involving preferences and recruitment, but predicted opposition to race-blind approaches, whereas support for the merit principle predicted opposition to preferences and support for race-blind approaches. Results suggest that established predictors of attitudes toward AA do not necessarily predict support for specific forms of AA.

Ancillary