Effect of Exposure to an American Indian Mascot on the Tendency to Stereotype a Different Minority Group

Authors

  • Chu Kim-Prieto,

    Corresponding author
    1. The College of New Jersey
      Chu Kim-Prieto, Department of Psychology, The College of New Jersey, P. O. Box 7718, Ewing, NJ 08628–0718. E-mail: kim@tcnj.edu
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    • 1

      This research was supported in part by a grant from the Summer Undergraduate Research Program at The College of New Jersey, which was awarded to Chu Kim-Prieto for the sponsorship of Lizabeth Goldstein. The authors thank Andrew Leynes and Candice Feiring for their comments on earlier drafts of the manuscript.

  • Lizabeth A. Goldstein,

    1. Ohio State University
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  • Sumie Okazaki,

    1. University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign
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  • Blake Kirschner

    1. Pacific University
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Chu Kim-Prieto, Department of Psychology, The College of New Jersey, P. O. Box 7718, Ewing, NJ 08628–0718. E-mail: kim@tcnj.edu

Abstract

Numerous findings have documented the adverse effects of stereotypes on those negatively portrayed by the stereotypes. Less is known about the ramifications of stereotype exposure on those who are not the objects of the stereotypic depictions. Two studies examined the effect of exposure to an American Indian sports mascot on the stereotype endorsement of a different minority group. Study 1 used an unobtrusive prime, while Study 2 used a more engaged prime. Study 2 also investigated the effect among those unfamiliar with the controversy regarding American Indian sports mascots. Results from both studies show that participants primed with an American Indian sports mascot increased their stereotyping of a different ethnic minority group.

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