Organizational Politics and Job Outcomes: The Moderating Effect of Trust and Social Support

Authors


Eran Vigoda-Gadot, Division of Public Administration and Policy, School of Political Sciences, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel 31905 Haifa, Israel. E-mail: eranv@poli.haifa.ac.il

Abstract

We propose a model for examining the moderating effect of trust and social support on the relationship between organizational politics and job outcomes. The model was tested empirically using data collected among 142 academics in one of Israel's major research universities. Findings based on interaction effects support the hypothesis that trust and social support are good moderators of the relationship between perceived organizational politics (POPs) and several job outcomes (i.e., job satisfaction, organizational commitment, stress, burnout). In other words, the potentially negative aftermaths of POPs can be controlled and reduced when trust and social support dominate the intra-organizational climate. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings, as well as recommendations for future studies, are suggested.

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