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Intergroup Discrimination Involving Negative Outcomes and Self-Esteem

Authors


John A. Hunter, Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, P.O. Box 56, New Zealand. E-mail: Jhunter@psy.otago.ac.nz

Abstract

Two studies examined the link between intergroup discrimination involving negative outcomes (i.e., removal of positive resources and allocation of noxious resources), global self-esteem (GSE), and collective self-esteem (CSE). Study 1 found that New Zealanders who took away more positive resources from out-group than in-group members experienced enhanced CSE, but not GSE. These findings were replicated in Study 2, with respect to the allocation of noxious resources (i.e., white noise). New Zealanders' GSE and CSE assessed prior to the allocation of noxious resources were unrelated to the subsequent allocation of white noise. The data are interpreted to indicate that intergroup discrimination involving negative outcomes leads to enhanced CSE. However, neither GSE nor CSE predict such discrimination.

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