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The Moderator Roles of Coping Style and Identity Disclosure in the Relationship Between Perceived Sexual Stigma and Psychological Distress

Authors


Amelia E. Talley, Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, 105 Psychology Building, 200 South Seventh Street, Columbia, MO 65211. E-mail: TalleyAE@missouri

Abstract

The current study examined whether the association between perceived sexual stigma and psychological distress is influenced by individuals' level of identity disclosure and their typical coping strategies. Regression analyses were conducted with data from a survey of 79 gay men and lesbians. Results revealed a 3-way interaction between participants' perceived level of stigma, the extent of their identity disclosure, and their utilization of avoidant coping strategies in predicting their endorsement of depressive symptoms. Findings also revealed an interaction between participants' perceived level of stigma, the extent of their identity disclosure, and their utilization of problem-solving coping strategies in predicting their endorsement of depressive symptoms. The implications are discussed with regard to various models of minority stress.

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