Parental Control and Junk-Food Consumption: A Mediating and Moderating Effect Analysis

Authors

  • AKRAM KARIMI-SHAHANJARINI,

    1. Department of Public Health, Hamedan University of Medical Sciences, Hamedan, Iran
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  • ARASH RASHIDIAN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Health Management and Economics and Knowledge Utilization Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
      Arash Rashidian, National Institute of Health Research, Italia Avenue, Tehran, Iran. E-mail: arashidian@tums.ac.ir
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  • REZA MAJDZADEH,

    1. Knowledge Utilization Research Center and Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
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  • NASRIN OMIDVAR,

    1. Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Technology, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
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  • MAHMOUD GHAZI TABATABAI,

    1. Department of Demography, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran
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  • DAVOOD SHOJAEEZADEH

    1. Department of Health Education and Promotion, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
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  • This study, as part of a multipart doctoral dissertation project, was funded by the Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The authors are grateful for valuable suggestions and comments from the editors, the anonymous referees, and H. Allahverdipour.

Arash Rashidian, National Institute of Health Research, Italia Avenue, Tehran, Iran. E-mail: arashidian@tums.ac.ir

Abstract

This cross-sectional study examined the mediating effect of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the moderating role of perceived parental control within the context of adolescents' junk-food consumption. Adolescents (N = 739) were selected using a cluster-stratified randomized sampling method. Social cognitions, perceived parental control, and junk-food consumption were assessed through self-administered questionnaires. Results revealed both direct and indirect effect of perceived parental control within TPB. Additionally, impact of intention was not moderated by perceived parental control. TPB explained 28% and 12% of the variance in intention and junk-food consumption, respectively. This study identified somewhat both the why and how of junk-food consumption in Iranian female adolescents.

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