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Fathers' (N = 125) attachment to their careers, perceptions of their wives' attachment to their careers, financial need to work, and gender-role attitudes were examined as predictors of their ratings of the effects of child care on children. Results supported the hypothesized model, with fathers' financial need, self-interests, and beliefs influencing their evaluations of the costs, benefits, and effects of child care. Findings were an extension of the social psychology literature on self- and vested interests, and previous related research, which examined mothers' self-interests and beliefs and their evaluations of child care. It is suggested fathers' and mothers' self- and vested interests should be considered when evaluating the effects of child care on children.