Be Proactive as Empowered? The Role of Trust in One's Supervisor in Psychological Empowerment, Feedback Seeking, and Job Performance

Authors

  • Jie-Tsuen Huang

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Human Resource Development, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China
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Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Jie-Tsuen Huang, Department of Human Resource Development, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien Kung Road, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China, 807. E-mail: vivian@cc.kuas.edu.tw or vivian@kuas.edu.tw

Abstract

This study explores whether psychological empowerment links to employees’ feedback-seeking behavior, as well as the subsequent consequences of feedback-seeking behavior (i.e., job performance) by showing that trust in one's immediate supervisor plays a key role. Data were collected from full-time employees enrolled in the On-the-Job Masters programs of 13 universities in Taiwan. Structural equation modeling was used to test the research hypotheses. The results of this study provide support for a process model that links psychological empowerment, trust in one's immediate supervisor, feedback-seeking behavior, and job performance. Specifically, psychological empowerment is positively associated with feedback-seeking behavior via trust in one's immediate supervisor. Moreover, feedback-seeking behavior mediates the relationships between trust in one's immediate supervisor and job performance.

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