It's not what you are, it's what you know: experience, beliefs, and the detection of deception in employment interviews

Authors


  • The study reported in this article was supported by grants from the German Research Foundation to the first author (RE 2218/4-1).

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Marc-Andre' Reinhard, Department of Psychology, University of Mannheim, A 5, D-68131 Mannheim, Germany. E-mail: reinhard@sowi.uni-mannheim.de

Abstract

This study investigated the ability of more or less experienced employment interviewers and laypersons to detect deception in employment interviews. Although correct beliefs about indicators of deception led to higher deception detection accuracy, more experienced employment interviewers did not show more accurate beliefs about indicators of deception and did not perform better at detecting deception than less experienced interviewers and laypersons. Furthermore, more experienced interviewers showed a less-pronounced tendency of judging messages as true irrespective of their actual truthfulness (truth bias) than less experienced interviewers and laypersons. It is suggested that experience in employment interviewing does not automatically lead to higher deception detection abilities in employment interviews, but that correcting people's beliefs about indicators of deception can do so.

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