Oxidative Stress and Adverse Adipokine Profile Characterize the Metabolic Syndrome in Children

Authors

  • Aaron S. Kelly PhD,

    1. From the Departments of Pediatrics,1Medicine,2 and Kinesiology,3University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; and the Department of Research, St Paul Heart Clinic, St Paul, MN4
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  • 1,4 Julia Steinberger MD, MS,

    1. From the Departments of Pediatrics,1Medicine,2 and Kinesiology,3University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; and the Department of Research, St Paul Heart Clinic, St Paul, MN4
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  • 1 Daniel R. Kaiser PhD,

    1. From the Departments of Pediatrics,1Medicine,2 and Kinesiology,3University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; and the Department of Research, St Paul Heart Clinic, St Paul, MN4
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  • 2 Thomas P. Olson PhD,

    1. From the Departments of Pediatrics,1Medicine,2 and Kinesiology,3University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; and the Department of Research, St Paul Heart Clinic, St Paul, MN4
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  • 3 Alan J. Bank MD,

    1. From the Departments of Pediatrics,1Medicine,2 and Kinesiology,3University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; and the Department of Research, St Paul Heart Clinic, St Paul, MN4
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  • and 2,4 Donald R. Dengel PhD 3

    1. From the Departments of Pediatrics,1Medicine,2 and Kinesiology,3University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; and the Department of Research, St Paul Heart Clinic, St Paul, MN4
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Aaron S. Kelly, PhD, St Paul Heart Clinic, 225 Smith Avenue North, Suite 400, St Paul, MN 55102
E-mail: kelly105@umn.edu

Abstract

Thirty-four children were assessed for body composition, blood pressure, lipids, glucose tolerance, markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and adipokines. Children were divided into 3 groups: (1) normal weight, (2) overweight but otherwise healthy, and (3) overweight with the metabolic syndrome. There were no differences among any of the groups for age or Tanner stage, and anthropometric variables were similar between the overweight and the overweight with the metabolic syndrome groups. Differences across groups were found for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P<.001), triglycerides (P<.01), fasting insulin (P<.001), homeostasis model assessment (P<.01), adiponectin (P<.05), leptin (P<.0001), C-reactive protein (P<.0001), interleukin 6 (P<.0001), and 8-isoprostane (P<.001). In children, oxidative stress and adipokine levels worsen throughout the continuum of obesity and especially in the presence of components of the metabolic syndrome. Overweight children with components of the metabolic syndrome may be at elevated risk for future cardiovascular disease.

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