Natural hybrids of S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii share alleles with European wild populations of Saccharomyces kudriavzevii

Authors

  • Christian A. Lopes,

    1. Departamento de Biotecnología, Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de los Alimentos, CSIC, Valencia, Spain
    2. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina (CONICET), Cordoba, Argentina
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  • Eladio Barrio,

    1. Institut ‘Cavanilles’ de Biodiversitat i Biologia Evolutiva, Universitat de València, Edifici d'Instituts, Parc Científic de Paterna, Valencia, Spain
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  • Amparo Querol

    1. Departamento de Biotecnología, Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de los Alimentos, CSIC, Valencia, Spain
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  • Editor: Teun Boekhout

Correspondence: Amparo Querol, Departamento de Biotecnología, Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de los Alimentos, CSIC, PO Box 73, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia, Spain. Tel.: +34 96 390 0022, ext. 2306; fax: +34 96 363 6301; e-mail: aquerol@iata.csic.es

Abstract

Saccharomyces kudriavzevii, a yeast species described from a pair of strains isolated from decayed leaves in Japan, has recently been isolated from oak barks in Portugal. Some data suggest that these European S. kudriavzevii populations could be closely related to the S. kudriavzevii genetic background present in natural hybrids isolated from wines and beers in different regions of Europe. However, a more exhaustive study of European S. kudriavzevii natural populations is necessary to confirm this observation. In this study, new S. kudriavzevii isolates were recovered from oak trees in different areas in Spain, and identified and characterized according to their molecular and physiological features. The restriction analysis of 35 nuclear genes amplified by PCR demonstrated that all Spanish S. kudriavzevii isolates exhibit three gene alleles different from those present in the Japanese S. kudriavzevii type strain, but identical to the alleles previously reported for natural S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii hybrids. These results clearly support the hypothesis of a European origin for these natural hybrids.

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